HighEdWeb Assocation October 10-13, 2010
 

Schedule

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Sunday, October 10

8:45
AM –
5:30
PM
Conference Check-In & Information (Fourth Floor Foyer, 4th Floor)
04695bb5-2359-4f96-8306-45c9c04a8288@2010.highedweb.org 20101010T08450020101010T173000
9:30
11:30
AM
Introduction to Higher Education and the Web
Introduction to Higher Education and the Web For those of you who are new Web professionals or are new to the higher education environment, we invite you to learn, share, and interact with other such Web professionals. This free, pre-conference workshop is available as an introduction or refresher. It will be a fun, fast-paced session covering a wide range of topics. There’s nothing you’ll need to know, and there won’t be any tests! Whether you know a little about topics like design and graphics, applications and development, hardware and databases, content management and social media, or need a short introduction to each, this is the place to come. We’ll even cover items outside of the Web field like enrollment management, alumni and giving, academic affairs, and more so that each attendee has a wide understanding of structures and goals. 20101010T093000 20101010T113000 Donna Hamilton (University of Cincinnati), Jim Nilson (Northern Kentucky University), Kevin Lavelle (Xavier University), Patti Fantaske (Penn State University)
12:00
1:00
PM
Lunch for attendees registered for paid afternoon pre-conference workshops (Hall of Mirrors, 3rd Floor)
ec50a46a-28cb-40e0-9e5d-7bdc103543d0@2010.highedweb.org 20101010T12000020101010T130000
1:00
4:30
PM
Workshops
Advanced CSS Workshop
Advanced CSS Workshop (WRK1)A hands-on opportunity to play with some advanced CSS concepts. Bring your laptops and an open mind. We'll cover many of the current hot design techniques: multi-column layout, faux-column layout, advanced image replacement techniques, advanced list manipulation, rounded corner boxes, son-of-suckerfish dropdowns, cross-column pull-outs, CSS hacks, and customized CSS for alternate devices.Salon H & I, 4th Floor20101010T13000020101010T163000Daniel Frommelt (University of Wisconsin - Platteville)
Designing iOS Apps Using Web Standards
Designing iOS Apps Using Web Standards (WRK2)There’s been a lot of hype about mobile devices since the debut of the iPhone in 2008. And now that there’s over 200,000 apps for sale in the iTunes App Store, a lot of content providers and Web designers want a piece of the action. But making apps is really technical and requires a lot of programming, right? It can... but it doesn’t have to. In this workshop, you'll learn how to design a mobile app by using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript – and you'll get the code you need to keep working with it and design your own app. In the process, you'll learn that your skills as a standards-based Web designer are much more valuable than you may have realized.Participants of this workshop need to provide their own Macs, and download and install the free iPhone SDK prior to the conference, to fully participate in all aspects of the workshop. The iPhone SDK is a very large file and should not be downloaded at the beginning of the workshop.Caprice, 4th Floor20101010T13000020101010T163000Kristofer Layon (University of Minnesota)
Developing and Maintaining Web Content: An Idea Generating Workshop
Developing and Maintaining Web Content: An Idea Generating Workshop (WRK3)This popular HighEdWeb workshop is a great way to start off the conference! Using some of the cornerstone topics in communications and public relations, this workshop examines the development of good Web content. The second half of the workshop looks at research techniques available for developing and assessing websites.Salon E, 4th Floor20101010T13000020101010T163000Douglas Tschopp (Augustana College)
Google Apps in the Higher Ed Cloud
Google Apps in the Higher Ed Cloud (WRK4)How do you promote engagement in higher ed and encourage student collaboration in a teaching and learning environment? Penn State has begun incorporating the use of Google Apps, a collection of Web-based programs and file storage to offer students familiar tools for productivity, communication, and collaboration in the classroom. See how Penn State is using cloud computing to get students to focus on course content and collaboration by sharing browser-based documents, calendars, and groups using tools in the Google arsenal. During this workshop, attendees will: learn how to integrate Google Apps and understand the appropriate use of the tools for communication (Google Talk, Gmail and Calendar), productivity (the Google Doc suite), and collaboration (Google Sites and Groups); analyze the advantages and disadvantages of using Google Apps for student-to-student and instructor-to-class interaction and collaboration; discuss the use of cloud computing, and the implications of putting course content in the hands of Google assess the effectiveness of Google Apps in higher ed and leveraging student familiarity in these tools and peer review of work; explore what opportunities are on the horizon in terms of mobile capabilities and new Google rollouts such as Google Buzz and offline functionality.Pavillion Ballroom, 4th Floor20101010T13000020101010T163000Robin Smail (Penn State University)
WordPress 3.0 for [strikethrough]Fun and Profit[/strikethrough] the Sake of Your Sanity.
WordPress 3.0 for [strikethrough]Fun and Profit[/strikethrough] the Sake of Your Sanity. (WRK5)WordPress is absolutely coming into its own as a content management system capable of tremendous customization and traffic...with the right tools and tweaks. It's being used more and more in higher ed and is proving to be a life saver for personnel challenged, budget challenged, and technically challenged campuses. Can WordPress rescue you from static and homegrown "solutions"? This workshop will cover setup, daily use, successes, and failures; level of acceptance on campus; and training. Handouts will include key plugins and customizations. The workshop will go deep into setups, screen-by-screen features, support in unique campus situations, and BuddyPress.Rookwood, 4th Floor20101010T13000020101010T163000Shelley Keith (Southern Arkansas University)
5:00
6:00
PM
Conference Welcome and Orientation Session (Pavillion Ballroom, 4th Floor)
66c39b01-6b4e-45fa-be7a-6d6068f473ef@2010.highedweb.org 20101010T17000020101010T180000
6:15
9:15
PM
Welcome Reception (Contemporary Arts Center, 44 East 6th Street, Downtown Cincinnati)
8f7e9879-72aa-438c-8249-5ab5268733ef@2010.highedweb.org Welcome ReceptionImmediately following our conference welcome session from 5:00 – 6:00 p.m. at the Hilton, take a very short, two block walk, across Cincinnati’s Historic Fountain Square and join your fellow conference attendees at one of Cincinnati’s most unique venues the Cincinnati Contemporary Arts Center. The reception will include heavy hors d'oeuvres, networking and some great music, not to mention the opportunity to browse the six floors of interesting art exhibits including Ernesto Neto’s Dancing Allowed. It’s a perfect way to kick-off your 10-10-10 experience.20101010T18150020101010T211500
9:15
PM –
12:00
AM
Party Like It's 10-10-10 (Mezzanine Level above The Bar at Palm Court, Mezzanine Level, Hilton Netherland Plaza)
34911d58-ac0f-42e8-94d2-56f56d73a87f@2010.highedweb.org Party Like It's 10-10-10Join the countdown to 10-10-10, 10:10 p.m. in the The Bar at Palm Court (located in our host hotel, the Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza), voted Cincinnati's Best Bar and The Place to be Seen in Cincinnati. The Bar at Palm Court offers a truly exceptional setting. So, let’s find out "if it's end of the world as we know it" as we countdown to 10-10-10.20101010T21150020101010T000000

Monday, October 11

Applications and Standards Content Marketing, Management, and Professional Development Social Media Technical: Propeller Hats Required Corporate
7:30
8:30
AM
Breakfast (Hall of Mirrors, 3rd Floor)
7973356b-9fdd-46fb-a6f2-760c50e0af8b@2010.highedweb.org 20101011T07300020101011T083000
7:30
AM –
3:00
PM
Conference Check-In & Information (Fourth Floor Foyer, 4th Floor)
dfd10d54-57ca-40e7-90dc-0f42cad49b7b@2010.highedweb.org 20101011T07300020101011T150000
8:00
8:15
AM
Opening Comments (Hall of Mirrors, 3rd Floor)
13d66001-e5e3-48b1-921d-51e49254794a@2010.highedweb.org 20101011T08000020101011T081500
8:30
9:15
AM
Hanging 10 in Google Wave
Hanging 10 in Google Wave (APS22)"Curse your sudden but inevitable betrayal...!"Rookwood, 4th Floor20101011T08300020101011T091500Robin Smail (Penn State University)
A Bargain-Bin MoMA: Content Curation for the Rest of Us
A Bargain-Bin MoMA: Content Curation for the Rest of Us (TNT22)The fire hose is spouting content nonstop. Somewhere in that stream, serendipitously, content is being created that organically aligns with your school's brand. On top of all the other hats we wear, "volunteer fireman" is now added to the list. Panicked? Don't call 911 just yet. Tthere are several ways that, using a variety of free tools and tricks, we can draw on content from the community to create a dynamic, real-time representation of our brand, powered by authentic, organic content. Web thinkers like Robert Scoble and Steve Rubel have called content curation the "next evolution of digital storytelling" and "the next big thing to shake the Web." It's no longer enough to simply aggregate. We must take the process of how we already read and filter the Web and turn it outward, taming the herd of content and hitching it to our brand. I will demonstrate the success I've had turning content found via social media monitoring into "found art," curated into a blog on the Tufts experience called Jumble (http://blogs.uit.tufts.edu/jumble). I will also offer a variety of take-home ideas that are easy to execute and affordable. And I will hopefully not mix as many metaphors in my presentation as I have in this abstract.Caprice, 4th Floor20101011T08300020101011T091500Georgiana Cohen (Tufts University)
SEO to the Max: Beginning Your Journey
SEO to the Max: Beginning Your Journey (MMP22)The realm of search engine optimization is always changing. There are always new tools and ideas that impact how content is indexed and recognized online. A prime example is the aggregation of links on social networks, all of which push users to our websites. In this session I want to talk about smart steps university Web developers can take to get their sites and content to the top of search engine results, including best practices and tool utilization. I will focus on tools such as the new woorank.com, Google Webmaster Tools, and other Web widgets and scanning software. This will be a great session to begin your journey into understanding SEO.Pavillion Ballroom, 4th Floor20101011T08300020101011T091500Zac Vineyard (Northwest Nazarene University)
Guided by Voices: Why Institutions Need a Social Media Identity
Guided by Voices: Why Institutions Need a Social Media Identity (SOC22)It is increasingly difficult to find an American college or university that has not adopted one or more social media tools. However, while the media has changed, the mechanics of one-way communication have not. Many institutions see Twitter as little more than an additional broadcast channel, and Facebook as a third-party repository (or replacement) for the exact same content provided on their official school site. And what’s so social about that? At Ithaca College we took a somewhat different approach. We realized our audiences — prospective students; parents; currents students, staff, and faculty; alumni — wanted to engage IC, not just listen to us drone. We used social media to reach out, to listen, to gauge opinions about the College, and to share the stories and ideas that make Ithaca unique. People have responded to the unique voice of IC on social media, one they recognize as distinct and personal. The bulk of this presentation will focus on Ithaca’s success in social media, and how finding the iconic voice of your institution will help you better engage and inspire the people you want to reach. Adapting what has been learned at IC to the University of New Orleans (an under-funded public university newly introduced to the world of competitive higher ed marketing by Hurricane Katrina) has offered a very different set of challenges. The final portion of the presentation will concentrate on building from scratch the voice of an institution with an as-yet-undefined new identity. Continental Ballroom, Mezzanine Level20101011T08300020101011T091500Jake Daniel (University of New Orleans)
CSS Methods for Mobile Devices
CSS Methods for Mobile Devices (TPR22)This session will give an overview of several generally accepted methods of using CSS for presenting content on mobile devices, describe how these methods affect each other, offer some best practices on their implementation, and wrap up with a "how-to" session for setting up and optimizing a Web page for presentation on the iPhone's screen.Salon H & I, 4th Floor20101011T08300020101011T091500Justin Gatewood (Victor Valley Community College District)
To Be Announced
9:00
AM –
5:30
PM
Exhibitor Hall Open (Rosewood, 4th Floor)
0c647018-003d-462a-a1f9-05fd83dc2511@2010.highedweb.org 20101011T09000020101011T173000
9:30
10:15
AM
Fancy Schmancy Usability Testing
Fancy Schmancy Usability Testing (APS23)Every website needs usability testing, but we have so little time, staff, money, and other resources. Yet our bosses expect us to test thoroughly, so we need to impress them, too. What to do?!? The trick is to keep it simple—VERY simple!  This presentation will show you how to conduct usability testing that is fast, easy, and free.  And with the help of a fancy schmancy technique that you will learn during this presentation, you'll impress your boss with stunning results.Rookwood, 4th Floor20101011T09300020101011T101500John Vieth (University of Wisconsin-Platteville)
Web Video for Cheap
Web Video for Cheap (TNT23)Professional video production firms charge thousands of dollars for their work. This presentation brings you quickly through some of the ways you can produce Web video cheaply and quickly for university websites.What you absolutely need to create effective and engaging videoWhat you can skip, or postpone to invest in laterWhen is it good to create your own resourcesWhen is it good to outsource resourcesThis presentation will include lots of examples to illustrate the points, as well as take-away materials so attendees can obtain a good base of knowledge to get going on Web video production right away!Caprice, 4th Floor20101011T09300020101011T101500Colleen Luther (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute)
Effective Brainstorming
Effective Brainstorming (MMP23)Brainstorming is a great way to generate new ideas. How can we get more out of a brainstorming session? In this interactive session we will explore effective brainstorming techniques and activities. Attendees will collaborate on creating a "mind map" and have the opportunity to practice their newly acquired brainstorming skills with fellow session attendees.Pavillion Ballroom, 4th Floor20101011T09300020101011T101500Kat Hollowell (Xavier University), Eric Smith (Xavier University)
"Hella Drop Shadow": Presenting and Teaching in the Era of the Backchannel
"Hella Drop Shadow": Presenting and Teaching in the Era of the Backchannel (SOC23)As Twitter's growth and hype continue, it seems like everyone is getting in on the act -- athletes, actors, politicians, and even educators are joining the virtual conversation. But what happens when that virtual conversation becomes the main event? How should presenters and educators prepare themselves for this reality? And what responsibilities do audience members have when thoughts shared amongst friends can suddenly become "trending topics?' Join us for a conversation focused on the need to understand how the crowd in the cloud and the sage on the stage can coexist to create an environment of engagement, respect, and conversation, including first-hand observations of some recent "tweckling" incidents (some closer to home than others).Continental Ballroom, Mezzanine Level20101011T09300020101011T101500Robin Smail (Penn State University), Patti Fantaske (Penn State University), Lori Packer (University of Rochester)
Inside Out: Sharing Local Data to Improve University Decision-Making
Inside Out: Sharing Local Data to Improve University Decision-Making (TPR23)Web professionals collect a lot of data: information that could serve as a powerful tool for colleagues around campus. What data are you collecting? What could you be collecting? Who might be able to use it? How might university decision-making be enhanced by this information? We will share examples of data collected by the Office of Web Services that have been used by offices around Xavier's campus to make better-informed decisions. The session will challenge Web professionals to evaluate our data and realize the possibilities that exist beyond our Web function.Salon H & I, 4th Floor20101011T09300020101011T101500Kevin Lavelle (Xavier University), Rob Liesland (Xavier University)
Running an efficient CMS evaluation and procurement process
Running an efficient CMS evaluation and procurement process (COR23)Running a procurement and evaluation process for a Web CMS project can be resource intensive and stressful. Running Web Content Management System evaluations can be inefficient and difficult to manage. At worst, your evaluation process, no matter how well intentioned and planed, may offer very little value to the selection process compared to just picking a system at random. Based on lessons learned from over 350 evaluation processes and HE web content management projects, this very practical, vendor neutral session will provide hands on tips, insider knowledge and advice to make your life easier and select a Web CMS that most matches your needs and implement it successfully.Salon E, 4th Floor20101011T09300020101011T101500Piero Tintori (TERMINALFOUR)
10:15
10:45
AM
Refreshment Break (Rosewood, 4th Floor)
bac3495b-25a7-4607-bf44-d865e9b12214@2010.highedweb.org 20101011T10150020101011T104500
10:45
11:30
AM
Building Awesome Sandcastles by Sharing in the CMS Sandbox
Building Awesome Sandcastles by Sharing in the CMS Sandbox (APS24)Limited IT staff? Limited funds? Find out how one large, public university banded together to purchase and implement an enterprise-level content management system. By maximizing university-wide IT talent and author content, we’re creating a stronger, more cohesive and consistent Web presence. And we’re making new friends. Because of the strong, grassroots support for an effective system, we received financial commitments from several campus areas, thus convincing the university to provide central funds for the bulk of the purchase. Similarly, we did not have adequate centralized IT staff to implement the system, so we recruited talented IT folks from across campus to work together to build the system. The collaborative effort is proving to be a model for other university-wide initiatives. We’ll share our planning documents, schedules and secrets for encouraging collaboration to maximize ROI and speed the delivery of Web content.Rookwood, 4th Floor20101011T10450020101011T113000Donna Hamilton (University of Cincinnati), Brian Warner (University of Cincinnati)
More Photoshop Secrets for the Web
More Photoshop Secrets for the Web (TNT24)Digital imagery is a great way to engage visitors on any college website. Compelling photographs connect prospective students to the institution and reconnect alumni to their alma mater. In the ever-changing world of digital photography there are new tools and techniques to produce better quality results, faster. This session (a follow-up to last year’s successful “Photoshop Secrets for Eye-Popping Images”) aims to arm Web designers with even more tips, shortcuts, and methods for producing spectacular digital images. With Adobe Photoshop and photos from William & Mary’s historic campus, this session will explore techniques for enhancing photographs for the Web. With a special focus on typography, Camera Raw and High Dynamic Range photos, this session is ideal for people with a wide range of experience with Adobe’s Creative Suite. We’ll even touch on some of the coolest new features in Photoshop CS5. This session will not dwell on abstract technicalities; instead we’ll take every day problems and explore various ways of solving them. While helpful to anyone who prepares photos for the Web, this workshop is most relevant to those already familiar with the basic functionality of Adobe Photoshop or Photoshop Elements.Caprice, 4th Floor20101011T10450020101011T113000Joel Pattison (College of William & Mary)
Managing Projects in Web Development
Managing Projects in Web Development (MMP24)Learn the latest Web project management lessons from a thirteen-year Web development veteran. There are things YOU can do to help manage the project load and the impact the projects you have. Learn to apply basic project management techniques to Web development and see how a PM approach can influence the administration, allowing you to gain control of your project list again. Web developers typically have tens if not hundreds of projects going all at once. Having a way to help manage the nightmare can mitigate the work stress!Pavillion Ballroom, 4th Floor20101011T10450020101011T113000Daniel Frommelt (University of Wisconsin - Platteville)
Where U At? Location-Based Services for Higher Education
Where U At? Location-Based Services for Higher Education (SOC24)Location-based services continue to grow thanks to increasing numbers of location-aware mobile devices -- not to mention big players like Facebook, Google, and Twitter getting into the act. Services like Foursquare, Gowalla, and Brightkite are perfecting the "check in, take a picture, leave a review, and earn a virtual badge" concept that’s helping the location-based services market grow to an estimated $3 billion business by 2013. But how can colleges and universities get themselves on the map and do more than simply check in? Location-based services can help universities improve and personalize campus tours, collect and share student-created geotagged content, incentivize student attendance at university events, build alumni communities, provide near real-time customer service for students, faculty and staff, celebrate campus history and mythology, or even track a senior administrator for a day. During the summer of 2010, NC State University began to rollout location-based mobile applications and websites designed to create the kind of authentic content, coverage, and community engagement few other Web efforts can duplicate. This presentation will discuss creative ways universities can leverage location-based services. The discussion will cover strategies for managing the concerns that loom large for administrators—privacy, unflattering reviews, and inappropriate content—in addition to unique considerations that come with partnering with a vendor or creating your own applications.Continental Ballroom, Mezzanine Level20101011T10450020101011T113000Tim Jones (NC State University)
Learning to Love the API
Learning to Love the API (TPR24)At Portland Community College we have a huge student body, a gigantic amount of Web content, and a tiny little Web team trying to manage it all. Over the years, we have built a collection of custom Web apps to help us out. These work well, but take time and massive resources to maintain. All the while, content creators continue to ask for new features found in third-party sites like Flickr and YouTube. Lately, we have been learning to let go and have other websites do the heavy lifting for us. This is where the Application Protocol Interface (or API) really shines. It gives you programming access to much of the data and features provided by a Web application without building one from scratch. Using API code gives you the ability to leverage the big Web apps for managing content, while still keeping the final content displayed inline on your website. We will explore how Web APIs can be used to progressively enhance and manage the content on your institutional website. This semi-technical session is an introduction for anyone interested in leveraging APIs. It will provide a background, go over the tips to help you avoid pitfalls, and provide the code to get you started.Salon H & I, 4th Floor20101011T10450020101011T113000Gabriel Nagmay (Portland Community College)
To Be Announced
11:45
AM –
12:30
PM
CMSDK: Understanding the Building Blocks of the CMS
CMSDK: Understanding the Building Blocks of the CMS (APS25)How do you compare one vendor's content management system against another? They all say they do RSS, blogs, and Web standards, right? What sets them apart from one another? In this session I present a framework and vocabulary for describing CMS features, architectures, design goals, and tradeoffs. The goal is to teach you how to break through the marketing hype to be able to compare products between each other and against your set of needs.Rookwood, 4th Floor20101011T11450020101011T123000Jason Woodward (Cornell University)
Developing a Mobile Website
Developing a Mobile Website (TNT25)Students now almost universally carry cellphones, and an increasing number are using smartphones to browse the Web. As a university we must see and respond to this by offering our services such that they are accessible by mobile devices. Mobile strategy today means deciding whether to focus on mobile apps, a mobile website, or a combination of the two. At Texas A&M University we actively pursue both technologies. We were the first public university to have a mobile suite in Apple's iPhone app store, but we have also been insistent on providing a mobile website that allows anyone to access our services, no matter what phone they use. While we will explore the advantages and drawbacks of each method, the focus will be on development of a mobile website. We will explore the decision-making process that goes into what kind of information to offer, topic areas that have proven most successful on our campus, and the technical challenges of writing code that acts the same across the gamut of mobile devices.Caprice, 4th Floor20101011T11450020101011T123000Erick Beck (Texas A&M University), John Chivvis (Texas A&M University)
Navigating and Surviving a "Perfect Storm"
Navigating and Surviving a "Perfect Storm" (MMP25)As an academic institution founded by the Sisters of Mercy, Saint Joseph College offers distinctive curricula that prepare both undergraduate women and continuing and graduate students of both genders to meet the challenges of their professional and personal futures. While SJC clearly had a significant story to tell, we realized that our storytelling vehicles were outdated and ineffective. The college's outdated website loomed large, and the decision was made to redesign the site and implement a content management system. A redesign, of course, entails much more than selecting a vendor. The process of effective Web redesign centers on institutional collaboration. Added to our collaborative outreach was the implementation of a new strategic plan; the decision to undertake a new branding initiative to drive enrollment; and the introduction of the new content management system - all moving forward at warp speed. Little did we know that we were headed into the perfect storm. Ultimately, this effort proved to be the catalyst for changing the college's culture of communications. This session will outline a successful brand roll-out, the lessons learned about Web redesign, the ways in which a content management system can help you survive the "stuff" coming downstream, and the outcomes we continue to realize as a result of our ambitious undertaking. This session is especially relevant for those in Web communications and marketing roles.Pavillion Ballroom, 4th Floor20101011T11450020101011T123000Kathie Kentfield (Saint Joseph College), Cynthia Mariani (Saint Joseph College), Beatrice Szalas (Stamats, Inc.)
Using YouTube for Recruitment
Using YouTube for Recruitment (SOC25)This session will focus on ways institutions have creatively and effectively used online video (produced professionally and in-house by staff or students) to market to prospective and accepted students. Attendees of this presentation will walk away with a list of ideas of how to highlight students, faculty, events, activities, and more. We’ll also see compelling statistics to encourage use of YouTube and discuss the importance of cross-promoting videos on other social networking sites.Continental Ballroom, Mezzanine Level20101011T11450020101011T123000Mallory Wood (Saint Michael's College)
Four Web Design Patterns for a Semantic Web in Higher Ed
Four Web Design Patterns for a Semantic Web in Higher Ed (TPR25)The Web is not just for people any more. Software agents, including all of the major search engines, are now crawling the Web and consuming not just human-readable text, but also semantic data and metadata embedded in normal Web pages. But a survey of the semantic Web landscape reveals a morass of conflicting terms, overhyped SEO techniques, and cynical detractors saying our current Web technology stack is "good enough". The reality is that the next big breakthrough in Web search technology will come from the harvesting and sharing of semantic data: either data embedded in the pages of today's human-readable Web or through linkable open data sets shared via the common communications standards we already know (HTTP, URIs, and XML). Popular CMSs like Drupal have begun to embrace the semantic Web, automatically generating semantics for the content served. In this talk, I'll present four patterns for integrating the W3C's semantic Web standards into today's higher education websites and applications. Each pattern progressively builds upon the others, culminating in a model for a fully-semantic Web application. Examples will highlight techniques that provide new capabilities or are not easily accomplished through normal practices of relational database-backed Web applications.Salon H & I, 4th Floor20101011T11450020101011T123000Brian Panulla (Panulla Information Systems)
Beyond Ethernet: 802.11n and the changing role of wireless in Education
Beyond Ethernet: 802.11n and the changing role of wireless in Education (COR25)Colleges and Universities are undergoing a significant transition in the way that they deploy networks in an effort to connect mobile users and support an evolving paradigm of pedagogy and research. In this session, we will discuss new strategies for supporting network infrastructure and mobility, highlighting lessons learned from those who have recently completed network upgrades. The session will look at ways to leverage the latest standards of wireless networking, such as 802.11n, to enable a mobile campus – an unmatched learning environment at a fraction of the costs of traditional networks.Salon E, 4th Floor20101011T11450020101011T123000Tim Cornett (Aruba Networks), Jim Bodish (Aruba Networks)
12:30
1:45
PM
Lunch (Hall of Mirrors, 3rd Floor)
94623e18-a75a-4607-98cc-7a86eff80df9@2010.highedweb.org 20101011T12300020101011T134500
1:45
2:45
PM
Red Stapler
Hello is Anyone Out There? Using Web Analytics to Understand your Audience
Hello is Anyone Out There? Using Web Analytics to Understand your Audience (RED1)So you have just installed a JavaScript code on every one of your pages to track visitors on your site. Maybe you used Google Analytics or some other service and you’re collecting all this great information. Well what do these terms mean and what metrics should I care about? After a quick explanation of terms this presentation will dig into how to filter Google Analytics for more exact and effective data. From here we will explore reports that are actually valuable to higher education and actionable steps that can be taken from this data. Finally we will talk about best practice techniques and explore analytics beyond your website, monitoring your institutions identity across the Web.Pavillion Ballroom, 4th Floor20101011T13450020101011T144500Kyle James (HubSpot)
It's the End of the Web as We Know It Redux
It's the End of the Web as We Know It Redux (RED2)We've come a long way from binary numbers and machine language. Technology marches on. As Moore’s law collides with Metcalfe’s law, the Web we see today and the devices we use to access it will become unrecognizable. Will the promise of the social Web, the mobile Web, the semantic Web, and the real-time Web be fully realized? Will the singularity become reality? What are the implications of ubiquitous computing? It may be time to rethink a few things. Completely updated for 2010, this award-winning presentation will focus on the (r)evolution of the Web and the implications for higher education Web professionals.Continental Ballroom, Mezzanine Level20101011T13450020101011T144500Mark Greenfield (University at Buffalo)
Maybe the Purpose of Our Redesign is Only to Serve as a Warning to Others
Maybe the Purpose of Our Redesign is Only to Serve as a Warning to Others (RED3)LOLcats ... demotivational posters ... Tales from Redesignland ... What more do you want?Caprice, 4th Floor20101011T13450020101011T144500Anthony Dunn (CSU Chico)
SMO & SEO: Promoting Your Website
SMO & SEO: Promoting Your Website (RED4)The growth in Web content and complexity added to the explosive popularity of social networks are the ingredients that are leading us to a social search era. In this context, refining your website to be positioned among the top10 results in search engines user queries is one of the best and cheapest ways of getting the right people visiting it. Search engine optimization (SEO) refers to the process of optimizing a website in order to get a privileged position in searches. On the other hand, the spread of social networks platforms has become a very influential factor to SEO in two different aspects: 1) the links and content that come from social networks affects search engine results ; 2) the user-generated content created in \social networks (videos, pictures, texts, etc.) are important digital assets outside of the websites that need search optimization as well. Social media optimization (SMO) refers to the process of optimizing a website in order to make it attractive and easily spreadable through social media channels. Besides being able to drive huge amounts of traffic to a website, SMO can raise positive dialog about the website brand. In this sense, search and social media are more dependent on each other in producing good promotion results. The presentation will address the main aspects of SEO and SMO for brands considering there Web presence, including universal search, social search, and mobile search.Rookwood, 4th Floor20101011T13450020101011T144500Martha Gabriel (BSP Business School São Paulo)
Talking to Your Boss About Twitter...
Talking to Your Boss About Twitter... (RED5)…and Facebook and YouTube, etc. Perhaps you've dabbled in social media personally and have some ideas on how your institution might participate. Or perhaps you've read about the impact of social sites and worry about being left behind. But how do you convince your boss that something called "Twitter" is a worthwhile investment of your time? On the flip side, when and how do you convince a department that maybe a Facebook fan page is *not* really necessary? This session -- totally revamped for HighEdWeb 2010 -- will cover both strategies and specifics to help you demonstrate to your boss, your VP, or your board the real value of social media.Salon H & I, 4th Floor20101011T13450020101011T144500Lori Packer (University of Rochester)
3:00
3:45
PM
March Madness
March Madness (APS26)The men's basketball team at Butler University captured the hearts and imagination of sports fans around the world as it progressed to the championship game of the 2010 NCAA championship tournament. Behind the scenes, a dedicated group of IT professionals watched the traffic to their main public website grow from 10,000 visits per day to almost 140,000 visits per day. While the basketball team dominated the hoops on the basketball court, this group of individuals jumped through hoops of their own, working around the clock to monitor and modify network traffic to accommodate the flood of traffic to Butler's website after the team won the Sweet Sixteen. Moving swiftly to react to the trend, this team utilized multiple tactics to prepare for the overwhelming amount of attention they would receive. Combining virtual servers, traffic manager technology, a combination of static HTML and CMS, redundant database servers and a few other tricks, the team was able to improve capacity with each win and be ready for the final flood of traffic during the Final Four and final game.Rookwood, 4th Floor20101011T15000020101011T154500Tim Roe (Butler University)
SEO Best Practices: The Low Hanging Fruit for Immediate Results
SEO Best Practices: The Low Hanging Fruit for Immediate Results (TNT26)Maybe you don’t even know what search engine optimization (SEO) is? Search engines are the first place that nearly everyone goes when looking for something. Having your site displayed at the top of results for relevant searches is a powerful way to get visitors to your website. In a sense it’s a way to provide free traffic to your site. Also because when people search, they are usually looking for a specific thing and being able to provide it to them you are gaining a relevant visitor. Unfortunately, when people think about SEO immediately those emails of spammers who guarantee #1 results in search engines come to mind. SEO doesn’t have to be black magic, pixie dust, or snake oil. College websites already have the authority to rank well in search engines, but are you getting the most exposure and relevant traffic that you could be? This presentation will go through the fundamental and approved methods for on-page optimization, off-page optimization, and implementing these best practices into your marketing efforts going forward. These actionable steps will be practices that you can take home and begin implementing on your site right away. Caprice, 4th Floor20101011T15000020101011T154500Kyle James (HubSpot)
Rapid Iterative Design: A Minimalist Approach to Requirements Gathering and Interface Design
Rapid Iterative Design: A Minimalist Approach to Requirements Gathering and Interface Design (MMP26)A priority for developers practicing Agile software development is to re-evaluate the role of documentation in the software development lifecycle. On many traditional software development projects, the outcome of the analysis and design phases is a lengthy technical specifications document which is turned over to the developers with the charge, “build this.” In reality, adhering to “the plan” rarely happens, because life is not static--the plan changes as new information is revealed. Hence, Agile developers place a lot of value on continuous face-to-face communication with the customer, iterative development, and minimalist documentation. We seek lightweight development techniques, so that we spend the bulk of our time on writing software, not writing documents. This presentation will detail how our team has combined four simple techniques—1) task-based scenarios, 2) personas, 3) user stories and 4) paper prototyping--into an Agile approach for gathering requirements and designing interfaces for custom applications. The primary advantage of this approach is that it is very light-weight: functional requirements can be generated very quickly, so that coding can begin earlier in the project. The deliverables are essentially stacks of sticky notes and hand-drawn sketches of interfaces. That’s it! It may not be appropriate for the development of campus-wide ERP systems, but in our experience, it has worked well for our small- to medium-sized Web applications.Pavillion Ballroom, 4th Floor20101011T15000020101011T154500Beth Snapp (Ohio State University, Arts and Sciences)
Why Do You Tweet?
Why Do You Tweet? (SOC26)For better and worse, Twitter has become the poster child of the social Web. But what's the allure? Tweeting is the act of letting your followers know what you are up to in 140 characters or less. It was never meant to be a social network. In fact, one of Twitter's co-founders, Evan Williams, believes Twitter's power lies in the fact that it's an information network and not a social network. And, I think he could not be more wrong. That may have been the intent when it was created, but that is not how Twitter is primarily used nor where it's power lay. I believe it's because Twitter is used as a social Web application that it is important and worthy of study. This session will explore the nature of the social Web in an attempt to get at its essence. Using Twitter as a reference point, we will examine the impact of the social Web on our notions of identity and community. We will discuss the continuous feedback loop existing between humans and the social Web and how each of us exists in our current state because of the harmonious tension we bring to bear upon each other. I posted this same question (Why Do You Tweet?) on YouTube awhile back, and it really struck a chord with people. The video was viewed hundreds of times and elicited dozens of responses from video replies, to blogs posts, emails, tweets, even a blog post on eduGuru.Continental Ballroom, Mezzanine Level20101011T15000020101011T154500Jeff Swain (Penn State)
Providing More and Using Less with Caching
Providing More and Using Less with Caching (TPR26)Serving up dynamic data is not only a given, but a must as the complexity of our Web projects continuse to grow. Learn how techniques used by Facebook, YouTube, and Wikipedia keep their sites running fast and their costs down as their content continues to expand. If your Web application is being syndicated worldwide or has just outgrown your Web server, there are simple approaches to caching that can be implemented to solve potential performance problems. This presentation will describe what caching is and how it can improve your site’s performance and sustained growth. Since no one solution works for everyone, different methods will be discussed including file, memory, and database caching. Each method will be explored in-depth to provide a better understanding of the problems each are meant to solve. Several practical examples will also be reviewed to demonstrate effectiveness and ease of implementation in real-world scenarios.Salon H & I, 4th Floor20101011T15000020101011T154500Jason Fish (Purdue University)
Enterprise Web CMS for Higher Education
Enterprise Web CMS for Higher Education (COR26)Come see a demonstration of OmniUpdate’s web content management system (CMS), OU Campus™. The five attendees to this session will receive a free gift! In addition, Nathan Gerber, Director of Web Development Services at Utah Valley University (UVU), will share how OU Campus is successfully utilized at UVU.  You’ll learn about what makes OU Campus the choice for more colleges and universities than any other CMS, including: Enterprise-class architecture — providing a secure and scalable environment, utilizing XSLT 2.0. Comprehensive Feature Set — offering tools like Social Media Publish to automate the publishing of content to Twitter (and other social networking outlets)Options and Services—professional services assistance for help with migrating and implementing sites, calendars, course catalogs, campus maps, and moreDeployment Flexibility –offering Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) or enterprise server deployment  Salon E, 4th Floor20101011T15000020101011T154500Lance Merker (OmniUpdate, Inc.), Nathan Gerber (Utah Valley University)
3:45
4:15
PM
Refreshment Break (Rosewood, 4th Floor)
57687b2d-ff85-49f2-b8fe-c1322efe001f@2010.highedweb.org 20101011T15450020101011T161500
4:15
5:00
PM
Hold Up! WordPress Can Do That?!? GTFO!
Hold Up! WordPress Can Do That?!? GTFO! (APS27)WordPress is arguably the best-in-breed blogging platform available today, and is being used on campuses large and small. Thanks to its active development community, flexible architecture and ease-of-use, it is being adapted and morphed into many different types of tools, all the while remaining open source and free. More and more campuses (including ours) are turning to WordPress as a content management system, but its practically begging you to let it do more for your institution's website, some of which may surprise you -- think job postings, classifieds, alumni communities, heck even a learning management system. This session will highlight some of those uses and show you how WordPress could make your life (and your campus constituents' lives) much easier.Rookwood, 4th Floor20101011T16150020101011T170000Mike Richwalsky (John Carroll University), Jesse Lavery (Allegheny College)
Web Content Best Practices to Share with Clients
Web Content Best Practices to Share with Clients (TNT27)We often build websites for our clients only to see the sites begin to lose value as soon as they are launched. We do all we can to make sure the photos are lovely, the wording concise and scannable, and the content the best it can be. Yet we know that when we hand it over to the client for maintenance, everything -- especially the content -- will begin a process of degradation. This workshop will go over best practices in Web writing and content management (not content managementsystems), and how we as Web "experts" can educate our clients in order to reduce that degradation as much as possible. Examples of best practices will be shown, and a worksheets developed by AgencyND -- the Univ. of Notre Dame's in-house marketing agency -- will be given as handouts to participants for their use in spreading the information to their clients.Caprice, 4th Floor20101011T16150020101011T170000Kate Russell (AgencyND, Univ. of Notre Dame)
Online Brand Development in a Decentralized World
Online Brand Development in a Decentralized World (MMP27)An online brand consists of words, images, calls-to-action, and site structure, which is then pulled together with consistent elements and navigation. How do you roll out an online brand with limited resources in a decentralized environment? Learn how one university incorporated Web site templates and training classes to create a successful “self-service” website program. Taking the focus off technology and helping users see that content and site structure are the keys to success allows online brand rollout to proceed more quickly, while ensuring the campus community understands how to make their websites more effective.Pavillion Ballroom, 4th Floor20101011T16150020101011T170000Jamie Ceman (University of Wisconsin Oshkosh)
E-Expectations 2010: What College-Bound High-School Students Demand From Your Web Site
E-Expectations 2010: What College-Bound High-School Students Demand From Your Web Site (SOC27)What do college-bound high-school students expect from campus websites? What types of content and features do they value the most? How do they feel about colleges using social media for recruitment? During this session, I'll share results from the 2010 E-Expectations study, an annual nationwide survey of high school students. I'll discuss how these students interact with college websites, including how students find the college websites, what content students value most and whether they are willing to scroll to read it all, and the interactive features they most like to use. In addition, this session will illuminate how students feel about campuses recruiting through social media. I'lll discuss what students reveal about colleges using social networks like Facebook, reading blogs and Twitter messages from campus personnel and students, and watching college-sponsored videos on YouTube. Attendees will leave the session with a greater understanding of how to engage students online and create a Web presence that meets their expectations.Continental Ballroom, Mezzanine Level20101011T16150020101011T170000Lance Merker (OmniUpdate, Inc.)
Transitioning to a Multi-tier Web Environment
Transitioning to a Multi-tier Web Environment (TPR27)What do you do when you have a website on end-of-live hardware with out-of-date software, and you have new virtual machines and software to run everything? Upgrade! Not so fast. How do you upgrade without disrupting service and within a reasonable amount of time, and without endless staff resources to throw at the project? This presentation will explain how the College at Brockport upgraded its aging SAMP environment to run on a set of virtualized LAMP servers.Salon H & I, 4th Floor20101011T16150020101011T170000Steven Lewis (The College at Brockport, State University of NY)
To Be Announced
5:00
6:00
PM
Special Interest Groups
52396e95-0b9d-4d7a-b157-1dd84de0a24d@2010.highedweb.org 20101011T17000020101011T180000
7:45
PM –
12:00
AM
HighEdWeb After Dark (Downtown Cincinnati)
a1b139b8-a8dd-4c0f-87ac-f2e847285d2a@2010.highedweb.org HighEdWeb After DarkDowntown Cincinnati boasts some of the most interesting hot spots in the area. Whether you’re interested in just having a drink with colleagues, taking a ride on the mechanical bull or watching Monday Night Football as the Minnesota Vikings take on the New York Jets or even Game 4 of the NLCS, make sure to come by the Ranch.And, if you're more adventurous, take some of your friends on a mini-pub crawl through the streets of Cincinnati. Make several stops with us on our tour.Each spot will have special drink offers for our HighEdweb attendees. Just show them your badge and enjoy!Rock Bottom Brewery8:40 - 8:40 p.m.10 Fountain Square Plz, Cincinnati, Ohio 45040http://www.rockbottom.com/cincinnatiBlackFinn8:40 - 9:20 p.m.19 East 7th Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202www.blackfinncincy.comBartini's9:20 - 10:00 p.m.580 6th Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 (corner of 6th and Walnut)www.bartiniscincinnati.comCadillac Ranch8:00 p.m. - Midnight38 Fountain Square Plaza, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202www.cadillacranchcincinnati.com20101011T19450020101011T000000
8:45
9:30
PM
Graeter's Ice Cream Social (511 Walnut Street)
f4e1271e-6bde-4810-9060-3f2005ed2856@2010.highedweb.org 20101011T20450020101011T213000

Tuesday, October 12

Applications and Standards Content Marketing, Management, and Professional Development Social Media Technical: Propeller Hats Required Corporate
7:30
8:30
AM
Breakfast (Hall of Mirrors, 3rd Floor)
a3b0ce8a-db4e-4915-adeb-af6117389abb@2010.highedweb.org 20101012T07300020101012T083000
7:30
AM –
3:00
PM
Conference Check-In and Information (Fourth Floor Foyer, 4th Floor)
62b5770c-9e65-4356-a307-1ce109cf70e9@2010.highedweb.org 20101012T07300020101012T150000
8:00
8:15
AM
Conference Announcements and Updates (Hall of Mirrors, 3rd Floor)
531d3f7d-adfd-48bc-a63f-41aa26c48b1a@2010.highedweb.org 20101012T08000020101012T081500
8:30
9:15
AM
Mobile Applications for Higher Education
Mobile Applications for Higher Education (APS28)With the growing presence of smartphones, modern colleges have been presented with a powerful new platform to deliver specialized content to the campus community. From creating customizable study tools to concentrating the core functionality of a college website, mobile applications represent an opportunity to remain at the forefront of cutting edge technology while creating unique tools that are most useful outside of traditional computing environments. During this session, we’ll take a look at two of the mobile applications that NKU has developed for the iPhone/iPod Touch. During the first portion of this session, we’ll discuss the development of NKU’s flagship mobile app, iNKU. With the development of iNKU, we’ve consolidated some of the most useful content that our online presence has to offer, such as our campus directory and schedule of classes. We’ve also created tools which are new with iNKU, like our TANK bus schedule app and streaming radio. During the second portion of the session, we’ll talk about NKU’s flashcard application. Intended to encapsulate the same functionality as paper flashcards, this app is a promising digital version of the time-honored study tool. Users can download specialized ‘decks’ of study questions with which they may quiz themselves.Rookwood, 4th Floor20101012T08300020101012T091500Thomas Barker (Northern Kentucky University), Curtis McCartney (Northern Kentucky University)
What's in It for Me? Progressive Personalization for Alumni-oriented Sites
What's in It for Me? Progressive Personalization for Alumni-oriented Sites (TNT28)Presenting information for alumni poses a significant challenge: alumni are widely diverse in geography, age, and interests, and the information and services we provide for them are similarly diverse. How can we direct each alumni visitor to the appropriate content without forcing them to choose among a huge bucket of options? As part of a recent redesign of the alumni-oriented parts of our site, Carleton College's Web team developed a strategy of progressive personalization, which addresses this problem by providing a customized experience across the full spectrum from anonymous visitor to logged-in, fully known individual. Come see how it works and learn how we pulled it off.Caprice, 4th Floor20101012T08300020101012T091500Mark Heiman (Carleton College)
10 Years In The Hole: A Possibly Cautionary Tale About Being A Higher Ed Web Geek
10 Years In The Hole: A Possibly Cautionary Tale About Being A Higher Ed Web Geek (MMP28)University of Washington Web designer, developer, producer, generalist, instructor, social media expert, and copier operator Dylan Wilbanks looks for ten lessons the higher ed Web can teach us about the university and the Web -- and how we can change how the university presents itself on the Web. As he prepares to close out his tenth year working on the Web in higher education, he will look back at his successes, if he can see them amid the flaming wreckage of all his failures over the last decade. His hope is to inspire those in the trenches of the university Web --writers, coders, marketers, all -- to hang on to the optimism that the Web and higher education instilled in us... or to convince them that working as a Wal-Mart greeter may ultimately be more fulfilling. The lessons will be about creating change within the ivory tower, seeking to fight the glacial pace of change with a blowtorch, an ice pick, and an obsessed determination Captain Ahab would find disturbing. Topics will include: Dealing with older faculty (and using their blind spots to back-door change); turning the university website from an “institution first” stance to a “students first” stance (in other words, user-centered design); using the glacial pace of change in the university to your advantage (by being bleeding edge without actually having to bleed); finding content for cheap/free when you have no writer (and relying on the long tail to find the content’s audience).Pavillion Ballroom, 4th Floor20101012T08300020101012T091500Dylan Wilbanks (University of Washington School of Public Health)
Social Media and Admissions -- The Fairfield LIVE Experience
Social Media and Admissions -- The Fairfield LIVE Experience (SOC28)Fairfield University, a Jesuit university in southwestern Connecticut, debuted Fairfield LIVE in July 2009 as a social media platform to augment its admisssions and student affairs activities on campus. Learn how Fairfield LIVE has put the admissions contact management process into the hands of students and how student groups, academic programs and administrators are using LIVE in conjunction with their traditional and online media communications efforts. Fairfield LIVE integrates seamlessly with Facebook and other social platforms and provides robust widget application development that allows a Web shop to easily distribute audio, video, blogs and discussions to other sites without complex coding or technical requirements. RSS media and traditional feeds are distributed using an application studio and simple backend that allow content from any source to be repurposed and distributed across campus websites. In our demonstration, we will show how easily content is redistributed to one of our admissions contact platforms, our WordPress blogs, and traditional .edu website in minutes instead of hours. Also, learn how Fairfield University is merging LIVE with its admissions contact strategy and tools to provide timely, interesting content to school prospects and how the platform is revolutionizing the prospect-to-student transition for Fairfield.Continental Ballroom, Mezzanine Level20101012T08300020101012T091500Scott B. Barnett (Fairfield University)
There, I Fixed It: Leveraging WordPress to Build a Web Application on the Cheap
There, I Fixed It: Leveraging WordPress to Build a Web Application on the Cheap (TPR28)In 2009, the University of Missouri Division of IT began a project to develop an IT systems status notification and alert system. The purpose of the project was to provide a central source for all IT system alerts -- scheduled maintenance, network or application outages, e-mail problems, and so on -- that could be searched and archived. Alerts could be posted by a small group of managers or on-call staff at the IT operations center. The alert system needed to be able to categorize alerts by affected service (so that a user could bookmark a page that listed only alerts of specific interest), as well as offering RSS feeds for all alerts and individual service alert categories. What do these requirements suggest to you? To our team, it sounded like a blog! Considering our limited budget and the alternatives, which were to either create a custom application or purchase a vended application, we opted to try WordPress. Other project requirements included the ability to output structured data (XML), so the system could be used to "push" current status alerts to other external and intranet sites; Active Directory integration, so we could use security groups to limit posting access; automatic e-mail alerts sent to individuals or mailing lists, according to category; custom fields for event severity and current status (active/resolved); and several other functions. WordPress was not a perfect fit, but it was able to bring us close enough to the primary project goals that we could develop the rest on our own. Salon H & I, 4th Floor20101012T08300020101012T091500Glenn Rice (University of Missouri)
To Be Announced
9:00
AM –
5:00
PM
Exhibitor Hall Open (Rosewood, 4th Floor)
8bff0be4-6764-4ff2-bfe8-a2b14e32232f@2010.highedweb.org 20101012T09000020101012T170000
9:15
9:45
AM
Refreshment Break (Rosewood, 4th Floor)
1d2820da-6580-4833-859c-ef3645259702@2010.highedweb.org 20101012T09150020101012T094500
9:45
10:30
AM
Don't Fear the Cloud -- Minimizing Concerns and Maximizing Benefits
Don't Fear the Cloud -- Minimizing Concerns and Maximizing Benefits (APS29)This is a time of immense budget pressure. It is also a time of more and more buzz around new technologies, social media, the cloud, and many others that affect the use and implementation of web systems. Clearly, the college website is mission critical to the success of any institution. How can we make its management cost effective and innovative at a time like this? It is often said that the best way to learn is by doing. Utah Valley University (UVU) has gone through implementation of four completely difference CMS solutions in the past nine years. They have definitely learned by doing! Come learn how a Web content management system (CMS) utilizing a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) model in the cloud has helped UVU control its hardware expenditures, reduce the man-hours associated with site deployment and maintenance, and improve website speed and performance. Learn about the questions asked; the lessons learned; and the pitfalls to avoid in choosing, implementing, and supporting a CMS solution. Finally, discuss whether a SaaS CMS would benefit your institution too. Rookwood, 4th Floor20101012T09450020101012T103000Nathan Gerber (Utah Valley University)
Video Killed the Radio Star, but It Could Help You Meet Your Goals
Video Killed the Radio Star, but It Could Help You Meet Your Goals (TNT29)Many colleges and universities have begun using video to tell their stories. While the narrative approach is a natural way to communicate, it doesn't mean much to organization leaders if there's no a return on their investment. To make a big impact in the minds and hearts of our leaders, we simply have to tie video to our strategic plans. What do you want to accomplish with video? We'll take you through the process of deciding if video is the right tool to meet your needs. Next, we'll discuss whether or not you actually want to make your own picture show, or if you should bring in a professional team. Then, through our case study, we'll talk about how one small school took on in-house video production and impacted recruiting in a big way. Whether you want to recruit more students, bring in more donations, or recruit more volunteers, this session will impact your bottom line positively. You will leave with a plan for using video to meet your goals and a timeline for achieving them.Caprice, 4th Floor20101012T09450020101012T103000Aaron Street (Southern Arkansas University), Tonya Oaks Smith (UALR Bowen School of Law)
Put People First and Everything Else Will Come Together
Put People First and Everything Else Will Come Together (MMP29)A website in an academic environment is a project in constant production with stakeholders that range from front-desk staff to the dean. How do you move gracefully across layers of leadership to redesign a college site in order to present a new and cohesive Web experience to your students and the public? Learn what the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Minnesota did to make this a success. By focusing on people first, a workflow was developed that built on the existing responsibilities of staff in each unit. With roles established, a new website and the technology to build and maintain it quickly came together. With people working collaboratively, traditionally tricky issues such as implementing new software, political buy-in for new visual designs ,and setting priorities were implemented with ease. This two-part presentation starts with the college's Chief of Operations who will discuss how the college tackled such issues as Web ownership; Web control; and relationships between the university, college, and college academic units. The second part of the presentation features the college's Web and Multimedia Lead. who will share how he developed trust across units to build a peer-group of Web editors. Putting the core college site last, this investment in people allowed the centralized Web services of the college to function in an open and collaborative way. When at last it was time to rebuild the core college site, it was done with input from every academic unit. The result? A brand new site with complete support and ownership from the college community.Pavillion Ballroom, 4th Floor20101012T09450020101012T103000Jeff Abuzzahab (University of Minnesota), Ryan Warren (University of Minnesota)
The Cluetrain Stops at Higher Ed, Will Anyone Take Delivery?
The Cluetrain Stops at Higher Ed, Will Anyone Take Delivery? (SOC29)The Cluetrain Manifesto is best described as a cross between In Search of Excellence and Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. Provocative, pretentious and brilliant, this seminal book describes how the Internet will mean the end of business as usual. And yes, it is directly applicable to the work we do. Part rant, part history lesson, part hope for the future, brace yourself for a wild ride as we explore the end of higher ed as usual, how the themes from Cluetrain provide a framework for our profession, and what this all means for us both individually and organizationally.Continental Ballroom, Mezzanine Level20101012T09450020101012T103000Mark Greenfield (University at Buffalo)
HTML5 Design
HTML5 Design (TPR29)Even though the specification is still being written, HTML5 can be implemented for your website today. In this workshop presented by Christopher Schmitt focused on real world solutions, attendees will learn about the new HTML elements and their semantics, HTML5 form elements, incorporate audio and video without Flash, new JavaScript API like geolocation, and more.Salon H & I, 4th Floor20101012T09450020101012T103000Christopher Schmitt (Heatvision.com, Inc.)
Extending your Campus Reach with Mobile
Extending your Campus Reach with Mobile (COR29)Does your institution have a mobile strategy to enrich teaching and learning? How about a plan to enhance life outside the classroom? During this session you will discover first hand how, with the help of Blackboard Mobile™ Central and Mobile™ Learn, you can build an effective mobile strategy that will drive student, faculty, staff, and alumni engagement, attract and retain students, reinforce your brand and maximize your existing campus resources, all from the mobile devices they love.  Salon E, 4th Floor20101012T09450020101012T103000Jim Brown (Blackboard Mobile)
10:45
11:30
AM
One Map to Rule Them All
One Map to Rule Them All (APS30)What good is a map that you can zoom, click, stretch and interact with if you can't take it with you? You know where the lecture hall is, but how do you get there on your bike? Let's ask the visitor in the parking lot how cool your map is when they are trying to find the admissions office. Maps are now used everywhere and growing in popularity. Can your map keep up? This session explores how to use the new Google Maps V3 API to make all your map dreams come true -- including the one where you're the campus hero for the stellar new iPhone/Android application. One map that just works everywhere. Based on experiences with the Missouri State Map.Rookwood, 4th Floor20101012T10450020101012T113000Chad Killingsworth (Missouri State University)
Helping Academic Websites Make the Grade
Helping Academic Websites Make the Grade (TNT30)Academic websites are a key component of the recruitment process. We know our future students (and their parents) are looking at these websites when choosing a college or university. So, why do these sites often fail to make the grade? The presentation will share how Missouri State University was able to systematically address our academic websites by gathering support, obtaining funding, and developing a workflow that involved both content and marketing experts. We'll also share templates that helped structure the content gathering and design process, making it easier and faster to obtain great results.Caprice, 4th Floor20101012T10450020101012T113000Sara Clark (Missouri State University), Don Hendricks (Missouri State University), Stacey Funderburk (Missouri State University)
Confessions From a Wicked Vendor (or What I Learned in My First Year on the Other Side of Higher Ed)
Confessions From a Wicked Vendor (or What I Learned in My First Year on the Other Side of Higher Ed) (MMP30)After several years working for colleges in one capacity or another, one year ago I defected and joined the ranks of higher ed vendors. It's the same industry, but a whole new world...and it's been a wild ride. This presentation will be a brutally honest recap about what I’ve learned along the way about managing people, projects, and expectations. It will discuss new ways of thinking about working with those around you (building trust, active listening, and utilizing negotiating tactics) and managing all of the projects on your plate at any given moment, from defining scope and requirements to predicting (and handling) roadblocks. Finally, if you're thinking about making the jump to the other side of the fence, this presentation will show you how to get noticed, what to think about before accepting that job offer, and advice about how to acclimate after you do.Pavillion Ballroom, 4th Floor20101012T10450020101012T113000Karlyn Morissette (Fire Engine RED)
Facebook Faceplant: Lessons Learned from Social Media Failures (and Successes)
Facebook Faceplant: Lessons Learned from Social Media Failures (and Successes) (SOC30)"We are controlling transmission... We will control the horizontal. We will control the vertical. For the next hour, sit quietly and we will control all that you see and hear." (The Outer Limits, 1963-1965 and 1995-2002) What happens when traditional media sensibilities are brought to social media? What can we learn from our experiences? Participate in a discussion of several case studies of social media failures and successes in higher ed, including: a giant traveling cut-out squirrel, a rivalry between the official newspaper and crowdsourced news site, a facebook admin's flame war with fans, and more!Continental Ballroom, Mezzanine Level20101012T10450020101012T113000Nikki Massaro-Kauffman (Penn State University), Cynde Fleagle (Penn State University)
Evolution of Form Design
Evolution of Form Design (TPR30)Our users have evolved: they no longer settle for a simple, one-way street of data entry. They want Web forms that interact and understand. Technology has also evolved: the increasing adoption of mobile devices introduces new challenges in form design, and the emergence of HTML5 provides new techniques for increasing usability. As users demand a better experience and technology becomes more sophisticated, evolution of form design requires these interactions to become creative, perceptive, and more human. This presentation will discuss the evolution of form design by showing techniques and real-world examples that improve user interaction with Web forms. Emphasis will be placed on best practices to consider based on past research and case studies. Learn how to leverage HTML/CSS markup to create forms that are accessible, semantic, and flexible for various styling options. Finally, we’ll look to the future by discussing what mobile devices and HTML5 have in store for Web forms.Salon H & I, 4th Floor20101012T10450020101012T113000Alex Kingman (Purdue University)
Who Is Siteimprove?
Who Is Siteimprove? (COR30)In our second year sponsoring the HighEdWeb Conference it is time we answered the question; who is Siteimprove?  The session will go a long way towards answering that question by discussing how Siteimprove was started, what does Siteimprove do, who does Siteimprove work with, and what the future will hold including the launch of our groundbreaking iTen service.  Salon E, 4th Floor20101012T10450020101012T113000Brian Stewart (Siteimprove), Steve Hennings (Siteimprove)
11:30
AM –
12:10
PM
Lunch (Hall of Mirrors, 3rd Floor)
6e720852-1fa8-458d-970d-6c390da5b359@2010.highedweb.org 20101012T11300020101012T121000
12:10
1:20
PM
General Session
Steve Krug Keynote by Steve Krug, author of "Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability."
Learn more about the speaker
20101012T121500 20101012T131500 Steve Krug
1:30
2:15
PM
Mobile Tagging & Augmented Reality
Mobile Tagging & Augmented Reality (APS31)Mobile tagging (QRcodes, Data Matrix, etc.) is the process of reading a 2D barcode using a mobile device camera. By allowing the encryption of URLs in the barcodes, mobile tagging can add a digital or online layer to any physical (offline) object, functioning like a gateway from the physical to the digital online world. Since mobile tags are simple tags that can be placed on virtually any physical thing or person, and since cell phones with cameras have become a very inexpensive and pervasive device, the mobile tagging process is one of the easiest and simplest ways of creating mixed realities between on- and off-line realms, especially augmented reality. The use of mobile tagging is endless, ranging from expanding the information on packages, bus stop routes, museum objects, personal identification, to applications in art and education. The presentation will a) introduce the concepts of mobile tagging and mixed realities/augmented realities; b) present the use of mobile tagging as a tool for augmented reality  c) teach how to create and use the tags (QRcodes and Data Matrix); d) show real cases of use.Rookwood, 4th Floor20101012T13300020101012T141500Martha Gabriel (BSP Business School São Paulo)
Got Centerpiece? So Does Everyone Else.
Got Centerpiece? So Does Everyone Else. (TNT31)Higher ed has a problem with its websites. Many of us are past that first big hump of "The Millennial Redesign." We've plopped down money on a shiny new CMS. Our design is hip and groovy. But an issue snuck in when we weren't looking. Centerpieces have become a staple component of the ever important home page. The problem is that they have homogenized us. We're all doing it, and we're all doing it the same. This presentation will look at a number of sites and their centerpieces, look at common themes, address why our current trend is a problem, and make suggestions as to where we can go and what we can do to stand out and differentiate ourselves.Caprice, 4th Floor20101012T13300020101012T141500Michael Fienen (Pittsburg State University)
Dirty Secrets of Web Directors
Dirty Secrets of Web Directors (MMP31)* How can you convince your boss you deserve to be paid more? * What's the best way to organize a Web department? * How do you motivate Web workers in a higher ed environment? * How do you say no (or "yes, but...")? * What's the worst problem with the Web in higher ed? * Should sub-sites have common, branded templates or unique designs? * How do you win arguments with faculty members? * How can you move from reactive to proactive projects? We'll tackle these questions and more in a brutally honest panel discussion featuring  Nick Denardis (Wayne State University), and Matt Herzberger (Florida International University) and moderated by Chas Grundy (University of Notre Dame).Pavillion Ballroom, 4th Floor20101012T13300020101012T141500Chas Grundy (University of Notre Dame), Nick DeNardis (Wayne State University), Matt Herzberger (Florida International University)
Ninging It: Social Networking as a Course Management System
Ninging It: Social Networking as a Course Management System (SOC31)As institutions of higher education migrate to Web-based course management software (CMS), the weaknesses of these first-generation tools become apparent. Most CMS's are often multi-layered, poorly organized and difficult for students to navigate. When students and professors become more tech-savvy, more is demanded from these Web-based tools. One alternative to the CMS is social networking site Ning. Librarians serving as adjunct faculty in the Armstrong Interactive Media Studies department discuss their use of Ning for course management. Offering multiple levels of Web 2.0 functionality, Ning allows users to actively engage and participate in course content. Informal feedback from students supports instructor assumptions regarding the ease of use, personalization, and collaborative nature of the tool. Instructors found Ning enhances communication with and among students and serves as a hub for all multimedia projects. This presentation will demonstrate how instructors engaged students utilizing tools such as Twitter, RSS feeds, API capability, blogs, and podcasts via Ning.Continental Ballroom, Mezzanine Level20101012T13300020101012T141500Arianne Hartsell-Gundy (Miami University), Amy Thornley (Miami University), Elizabeth Sullivan (Miami University)
Taming Google Mini
Taming Google Mini (TPR31)Consider this a short course in funneling the power of a Google Mini Appliance into usable, branded result sets. We'll focus on utilizing the built-in helper tools, extending the front-end stylesheets, pulling stripped HTML through requests and inline frames, and parsing the XML directly. These methods will help ensure that your visitors get the results they're looking for, and enable you to display them in a pleasing format that has the functionality your audience requires.Salon H & I, 4th Floor20101012T13300020101012T141500Kevin Zink (mStoner)
To Be Announced
2:15
2:45
PM
Refreshment Break (Rosewood, 4th Floor)
12fefa75-e95e-4e66-bab3-ea905b4b5141@2010.highedweb.org 20101012T14150020101012T144500
2:45
3:30
PM
Analyzing Real-time Internal User Searches
Analyzing Real-time Internal User Searches (APS32)Higher education websites always have a steady supply of visitors. It's great to see the numbers in Google Analyics fluctuate each day and trend upwards over time, but are your visitors finding what they came for? This talk is a high-level-to-in-depth look at tracking what visitors are searching for in real time from your site. We'll go beyond the consolidated "popular keywords" list to an actual trend list with grouped phases and pages. The goal is peer into the visitor's mind and figure out why they are searching for "address" on the Contact Us page or "Professor Smith" on the Faculty Information page. Higher education websites always struggle to accommodate two audiences, internal and external. Search results based on location don't lie, it's easy to combine real internal searches with reasons why quicklinks and extra menus may or may not be functioning as optimally as they should. It's time to go beyond pageviews and user paths and look at real-time search analytics.Rookwood, 4th Floor20101012T14450020101012T153000Nick DeNardis (Wayne State University)
Content Strategy: The Key to Effective Web Content
Content Strategy: The Key to Effective Web Content (TNT32)Content is why people visit your website. Period. So why is quality content so easily discounted? Why do we neglect this critical website element that we rely on to attract, inform, engage, and retain site visitors? Answer: content is massive, political, and time-consuming. A college website contains thousands of pages with limited content contributors, editors, and managers, all with different perspectives and priorities. Web content strategy is an essential discipline that author Kristina Halvorson defines as "the practice of planning for the creation, delivery, and governance of useful, usable content." In this session, learn how to implement and maintain effective content that drives marketing, engages users, and increases website conversions.Caprice, 4th Floor20101012T14450020101012T153000Rick Allen (Babson College)
Behind the Green Door: Life on the Other Side of a Homepage Redesign
Behind the Green Door: Life on the Other Side of a Homepage Redesign (MMP32)Last March, after two years of research and development that involved people from all over campus, we finally launched our new homepage… and stepped behind the ‘green door’ into a new world of managing our university’s Web presence. Because we radically refocused the purpose and message of our homepage, instituted a new Web governance structure, adopted a new HTML framework, and implemented a new Web content management system, we find ourselves in a radically different Web world. A world where departments that never really communicated before have to work together on a daily basis to keep the homepage up to date and working. A world where we have no choice but to share technical resources across units, not only to implement our new Web presence, but to manage and expand it. Some of us saw this coming, when we assembled a design team from disparate parts of the university to build the new homepage. Some thought things would go back the way they were before, once the homepage went live. But the reality is that we have no choice now but to work in different ways and work together in new ways. This presentation will examine how our redesign has affected our approach to Web management, changed our organizational structures, and forced new ways of thinking, learning and cooperating across departmental lines (not only our ‘Web team’, but also on our public relations and IT management). In addition, this presentation will outline both pitfalls and best practices for planning for, managing, and dealing with these fundamental changes in how your campus may have do business after the launch of a redesign. There may be lolcats.Pavillion Ballroom, 4th Floor20101012T14450020101012T153000Anthony Dunn (CSU Chico)
Powered by Orange: Lessons from Launching a Digitally Driven Campaign
Powered by Orange: Lessons from Launching a Digitally Driven Campaign (SOC32)In 2009, Oregon State University launched a national campaign called "Powered by Orange." With a languishing economy and dwindling advertising budget, we were tasked with raising awareness about OSU and its impact on our region, and in the world. And we were asked to do this with a reduced budget. poweredbyorange.com was born, and it became the cornerstone of a multifaceted, award-winning campaign. For the first time, television advertising was abandoned and social media was embraced. Instead of buying TV air time, we hired a social media specialist. Instead of working with an external agency, we did all of the creative work in house. Heavily driven by social networks and Web tactics, the campaign also had comparable efforts in print, live events, and media relations. We did a lot of experimentation along the way. And in the process, we learned quite a few lessons. First, every virtual component needs a physical-world counterpart, for reasons ranging from mobilizing your internal ambassadors to energizing content contributors who eventually engage with you online. We also learned a lot about creating internal buy-in and alignment, to taking advantage of chance occurrences, ongoing efforts and peripheral happenings to advance our campaign. Powered by Orange is a Web-driven campaign with real-world connections. More than a year into the effort, we're still moving forward with new successes (and plenty of failures), and gathering some recognition and awards along the way.Continental Ballroom, Mezzanine Level20101012T14450020101012T153000David Baker (Oregon State University)
Reputation Systems in Web Communities
Reputation Systems in Web Communities (TPR32)How do we design community-based websites that provide incentive for participation and involvement? In this top presentation from BoilerWeb 2010, we'llexplore different patterns of reputation used in Web applications and the methods behind their design. We'll identify technical characteristics associated with each pattern, outline uses in existing communities, and highlight examples of effective and ineffective implementations. Whether it’s a collaborative reviews community like Yelp, a cordial question/answer education community, or competitive game, reputation models are one of the driving factors behind user interaction. Some of the reputation patterns to be discussed include numbered levels, collective achievements, points, leaderboards, and labels. Interaction models include combative, competitive, cordial, collaborative, and caring, each encompassing a different spectrum of appropriate patterns. By creating an understanding of the visual patterns and models for their inclusion, a reputation system can be constructed to align user incentives with site goals. Social communities are no longer a niche subset of existing websites; they are a core component of our online behavior and pose several new questions we can ask ourselves before designing our own. Salon H & I, 4th Floor20101012T14450020101012T153000Steve Heady (Purdue University)
To Be Announced
3:30
5:00
PM
Poster Sessions
@2010.highedweb.org 20101012T15300020101012T170000
6:30
9:30
PM
Special Excursion at the Newport Aquarium (Newport Aquarium, One Aquarium Way, Newport of the Levee)
135fc1db-b789-4d03-9f87-d58489658458@2010.highedweb.org Special Excursion at the Newport AquariumSpend time with friends and colleagues and enjoy distinctive food within a million gallons of water. Interested in sharing dessert around jellyfish, having appetizers with alligators or even grabbing a drink while actually touching a shark? The Newport Aquarium will serve as a fun filled backdrop to the culmination of a great conference.20101012T18300020101012T213000
9:30
PM –
12:00
AM
Octoberfest Zinzinnati: Hofbrauhaus (Hofbrauhaus, 3rd and Saratoga, Newport on the Levee)
4896ffa8-69d8-4755-bf4f-8a5d3ec51a2d@2010.highedweb.org Octoberfest Zinzinnati: HofbrauhausHow about a night cap at one of the most unique venues in Cincinnati? Located just across from the Newport Aquarium, the Hofbrauhaus’ traditional German Bier Hall is a fun place to end an evening. Brewing their own beer and providing live entertainment, Hofbrauhaus is the perfect place to wind down the final HighEdWeb evening.Beverages and food will be available on a cash basis. At 10:00 p.m., a HighEdWeb authentic German appetizer platter will be available for your enjoyment. Sample the sauerkraut balls, fried pickles and of course the "Wurst" sampler.20101012T21300020101012T000000

Wednesday, October 13

Applications and Standards Content Marketing, Management, and Professional Development Social Media Technical: Propeller Hats Required
8:00
9:00
AM
Breakfast (Hall of Mirrors, 3rd Floor)
0f268710-41bd-4c9d-a642-722c44d9e02b@2010.highedweb.org 20101013T08000020101013T090000
8:15
8:45
AM
Best of Track Awards (Hall of Mirrors, 3rd Floor)
5909d900-7700-466a-9151-f6a6fc758302@2010.highedweb.org 20101013T08150020101013T084500
9:00
9:45
AM
Essential Strategies for a Student-Staffed Social Team
Essential Strategies for a Student-Staffed Social Team ()Engaging students on social media is a difficult task, but guess what? No one knows how to engage students on social media better than the students themselves! But how do you even start leveraging their skills, insight, and perspectives as part of your social team? Hint: it isn’t as simple sitting students in front of a computer. This session will review how to hire and manage your student team, tools to use for team management, advice on recruiting the best candidates, and other helpful things to keep in mind when working with students.20101013T09000020101013T094500Chad Killingsworth (Missouri State University)
Beyond the Buildings: A New Generation of Campus Maps
Beyond the Buildings: A New Generation of Campus Maps ()Campus maps are often monolithic and confined to a single page or section on your web site, and sometimes are even just a link to a PDF. Lee and To will talk about rethinking the whole idea of the campus map, and how to go from a single stand-alone map to a modular, extensible map system, that you can use throughout your web site and build/layer other types of location-based content on top of. For example, a self-guided mobile walking tour of historic buildings, a virtual tour of sustainability features around campus, a landscape/garden tour showing how the landscaping of the physical campus enhances the academic experience. Also: event, parking, and accessibility information; department and office locations. The session will cover strategy, process, challenges, opportunities, and touch on adding HTML5 geolocation for mobile use, empowering campus groups to make their own simple maps, using available community-generated data, and open-source tools. 20101013T09000020101013T094500Mark Heiman (Carleton College)
Node.js + Higher Ed = Awesome!
Node.js + Higher Ed = Awesome! () Such Node.js, much happy, wow! You might think that Node.js is a newcomer in town, but it has been around for for about 5 years now! Very prominent companies such as LinkedIn, Paypal, Walmart, and Yahoo! have adopted Node.js and are paving the way for it to become the next major platform. Node.js will make your developers happy and your Rails, PHP and Java developers jealous. Node.js is quickly becoming a highly performing, efficiently coded, happy-developer platform and it fits right into the Higher Ed community. This talk will explore the advantages of using Node.js in Higher Ed. We’ll discuss several use-cases ranging from powering a mobile application to a full-blown web application and how to start the conversation to start using Node.js! Getting started is easy and the power of the Node.js community shines a light on the endless possibilities.20101013T09000020101013T094500Dylan Wilbanks (University of Washington School of Public Health)
No Better Time Than “NOW”: Telling the Story of How We’re Telling our Story
No Better Time Than “NOW”: Telling the Story of How We’re Telling our Story ()Inspired by the 2011 Best of Track presentation, Elizabethtown College took telling its own story into its own hands. E-town NOW, launched in the fall of 2013, is a dynamic, story-telling venue. Talarico, editor of the online publication, will walk attendees through the process (read: patience) of getting this project off the ground, from inception to conception and from production to introduction. She will also share how NOW built and mobilized a student editorial team (read: mentoring oops!), how they promote NOW and encourage story ideas from the community (hint: it's sweet), and explain how the online newsroom contributes to or streamlines other multiplatform marketing and communications efforts. (For example, the introduction of NOW lead to changes in E-town’s massive weekly internal newsletter.) Additionally, Talarico will touch on the rebranding of the College’s “subject matter expert list” into “Experts @ E-town,” which includes web, email and postcard campaigns. This presentation is right for anyone looking for a new way of presenting and producing news, but for smaller staffs/institutions, E-town NOW is a testament that it can be done with limited resources. 20101013T09000020101013T094500David Baker (Oregon State University)
It Takes a Village: Moving Toward Mobile
It Takes a Village: Moving Toward Mobile ()Texas A&M University is implementing its Go Mobile! Initiative to encourage mobile-friendly communication across campus. The presentation will discuss the cooperative model used by their Mobile Strategy Team to develop a mobile strategy, web resources, and supportive community; resulting in a mobile-aware campus and tremendous growth in responsive websites.20101013T09000020101013T094500Christopher Schmitt (Heatvision.com, Inc.)
9:45
10:15
AM
Refreshment Break (Fourth Floor Foyer, 4th Floor)
80762209-ee23-40b4-80cd-9c676587a147@2010.highedweb.org 20101013T09450020101013T101500
10:15
11:00
AM
Essential Strategies for a Student-Staffed Social Team
Essential Strategies for a Student-Staffed Social Team ()Engaging students on social media is a difficult task, but guess what? No one knows how to engage students on social media better than the students themselves! But how do you even start leveraging their skills, insight, and perspectives as part of your social team? Hint: it isn’t as simple sitting students in front of a computer. This session will review how to hire and manage your student team, tools to use for team management, advice on recruiting the best candidates, and other helpful things to keep in mind when working with students.20101013T10150020101013T110000Chad Killingsworth (Missouri State University)
Beyond the Buildings: A New Generation of Campus Maps
Beyond the Buildings: A New Generation of Campus Maps ()Campus maps are often monolithic and confined to a single page or section on your web site, and sometimes are even just a link to a PDF. Lee and To will talk about rethinking the whole idea of the campus map, and how to go from a single stand-alone map to a modular, extensible map system, that you can use throughout your web site and build/layer other types of location-based content on top of. For example, a self-guided mobile walking tour of historic buildings, a virtual tour of sustainability features around campus, a landscape/garden tour showing how the landscaping of the physical campus enhances the academic experience. Also: event, parking, and accessibility information; department and office locations. The session will cover strategy, process, challenges, opportunities, and touch on adding HTML5 geolocation for mobile use, empowering campus groups to make their own simple maps, using available community-generated data, and open-source tools. 20101013T10150020101013T110000Mark Heiman (Carleton College)
Node.js + Higher Ed = Awesome!
Node.js + Higher Ed = Awesome! () Such Node.js, much happy, wow! You might think that Node.js is a newcomer in town, but it has been around for for about 5 years now! Very prominent companies such as LinkedIn, Paypal, Walmart, and Yahoo! have adopted Node.js and are paving the way for it to become the next major platform. Node.js will make your developers happy and your Rails, PHP and Java developers jealous. Node.js is quickly becoming a highly performing, efficiently coded, happy-developer platform and it fits right into the Higher Ed community. This talk will explore the advantages of using Node.js in Higher Ed. We’ll discuss several use-cases ranging from powering a mobile application to a full-blown web application and how to start the conversation to start using Node.js! Getting started is easy and the power of the Node.js community shines a light on the endless possibilities.20101013T10150020101013T110000Dylan Wilbanks (University of Washington School of Public Health)
No Better Time Than “NOW”: Telling the Story of How We’re Telling our Story
No Better Time Than “NOW”: Telling the Story of How We’re Telling our Story ()Inspired by the 2011 Best of Track presentation, Elizabethtown College took telling its own story into its own hands. E-town NOW, launched in the fall of 2013, is a dynamic, story-telling venue. Talarico, editor of the online publication, will walk attendees through the process (read: patience) of getting this project off the ground, from inception to conception and from production to introduction. She will also share how NOW built and mobilized a student editorial team (read: mentoring oops!), how they promote NOW and encourage story ideas from the community (hint: it's sweet), and explain how the online newsroom contributes to or streamlines other multiplatform marketing and communications efforts. (For example, the introduction of NOW lead to changes in E-town’s massive weekly internal newsletter.) Additionally, Talarico will touch on the rebranding of the College’s “subject matter expert list” into “Experts @ E-town,” which includes web, email and postcard campaigns. This presentation is right for anyone looking for a new way of presenting and producing news, but for smaller staffs/institutions, E-town NOW is a testament that it can be done with limited resources. 20101013T10150020101013T110000David Baker (Oregon State University)
It Takes a Village: Moving Toward Mobile
It Takes a Village: Moving Toward Mobile ()Texas A&M University is implementing its Go Mobile! Initiative to encourage mobile-friendly communication across campus. The presentation will discuss the cooperative model used by their Mobile Strategy Team to develop a mobile strategy, web resources, and supportive community; resulting in a mobile-aware campus and tremendous growth in responsive websites.20101013T10150020101013T110000Christopher Schmitt (Heatvision.com, Inc.)
11:15
AM –
12:00
PM
Closing Remarks, Prestige Award, Door Prizes (Hall of Mirrors, 3rd Floor)
e2890435-b18d-40be-98f9-ee1fe7e99a88@2010.highedweb.org 20101013T11150020101013T120000
12:00
12:45
PM
Closing Lunch (Hall of Mirrors, 3rd Floor)
a96879ab-5eff-4599-9310-4db6c3ea7bb3@2010.highedweb.org 20101013T12000020101013T124500
1:00
4:30
PM
Workshops
Client-side Interactivity Through Javascript - An Introduction to jQuery and AJAX
Client-side Interactivity Through Javascript - An Introduction to jQuery and AJAX (WRK6)Today's website consumers demand a tremendous amount of flexibility, resposiveness, and interactivity from the sites they visit. People have become used to Web applications like Facebook, GMail, and Twitter which make heavy use of Web browser client-side programming in JavaScript and interaction with Web services using the AJAX programming model. This workshop will teach you the basics of Web browser client-side programming using Web standards. We'll take a quick tour of HTTP, DOM, Javascript, XML, and JSON, then jump in with hands-on exercises using the jQuery Javascript library, building up an interactive website utilizing AJAX Web services. For those who attended in 2009 you should expect to see an increased number of exercises this year. You should come prepared with a laptop, your favorite text editor, and the latest version of the Firefox Web browser. Before the conference we'll also provide a list of Firefox extensions you'll need to install. A familiarity with JavaScript, DOM, XHTML, CSS and some client-side programming is necessary for this session.Salon H & I, 4th Floor20101013T13000020101013T163000Jason Woodward (Cornell University)
CSS3... in 3D!
CSS3... in 3D! (WRK7)The advent of CSS3 allows for greater control and creativity in Web design. Attendees in this workshop will learn about using colors through RGBa and opacity, border images, text and box shadows, animations, transformations, and much much more to enrich their Web designs. And, yes, free 3D glasses will be distributed to attendees!Salon E, 4th Floor20101013T13000020101013T163000Christopher Schmitt (Heatvision.com, Inc.)
Google Analytics for Higher Ed
Google Analytics for Higher Ed (WRK8)Google Analytics is a powerful, enterprise-ready Web analytics tool that provides actionable, data-supported insights into website performance. This tool, when leveraged correctly, can provide quantitative information pertaining to the success (or failure) of content, marketing campaigns, goal conversions, and site effectiveness. Because of its robust feature set and affordable price, Google Analytics has become one of the most widely used analytical applications in higher education. In turn -- as many institutions are experiencing shrinking budgets -- recruitment and retention activities are embracing advanced online strategies. In order to justify these strategies and to examine their success, a powerful and customizable Web analytics strategy must be adopted to calculate returns on investment. Such strategies can be created and thoroughly evaluated with Google Analytics. During this workshop, we will explore in great depth the terminology and features of Google Analytics that every Web manger, marketer, designer, and developer needs to understand in order to accurately gauge the effectiveness of his or her institution's or department's website. We will also extend last year's workshop (prior attendance not required) and discuss advancements with goals, social media tracking, mobile website measurement, mobile app tracking, and much more!Rookwood, 4th Floor20101013T13000020101013T163000Seth Meranda (University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Noel-Levitz)
How to Build an Effective Keyword List for SEO/SEM
How to Build an Effective Keyword List for SEO/SEM (WRK9)If the age of Internet search has taught us anything, it’s that we humans are amazingly similar in the way we think. In the world of search engine optimization and marketing, this homogeny can be used to develop an effective list of keyword search terms. By sorting and filtering through Google Analytics and using other real-time data sources, we can glimpse inside the minds of our target audience to reveal the common words and patterns they use to find us. These bits of insight, if captured and utilized properly, are the foundations of effective SEO/SEM strategies. This is a hands-on workshop. A sample scenario will be utilized for in-class exercises, but attendees may bring a real situation from their institutions to use instead. Attendees can expect to leave with a thorough understanding of techniques and a preliminary list of keywords. A laptop with Wi-Fi and Excel 2007 is required for the full workshop experience. Attendees wishing to customize the exercises will also need access to Google Analytics or other website statistics reporting package capable of exporting data. The presenter will supply each attendee with a jump drive containing the workshop presentation and sample files to use for exercises.Salon D, 4th Floor20101013T13000020101013T163000Doug Clark (Collegiate Web Solutions)
Is It Working Yet? Social Media Convergence Marketing for Higher Education
Is It Working Yet? Social Media Convergence Marketing for Higher Education (WRK10)In the last few years, interest in social media has exploded on college campuses, nowhere more so than in marketing and admissions departments. There’s been a significant increase in institutional Facebook pages, YouTube.edu channels, blogs, and Twitter accounts, yet the jury’s still out on when it comes to results. We know that social media tools don’t work well in isolation—they become more powerful by coming together with other social media. Yet we’re still seeing a lot of isolated, one-off tactics, like throwing up a Facebook page and hoping fans will come. In this presentation, we’ll explore the building blocks of social media convergence marketing and help you move your institution beyond one-off tactics to achieve recruiting and marketing goals. Social media convergence marketing synchronizes platforms, content, and interactions, drives traffic, and amplifies the viral environment in which institutional social media communities can flourish. We’ll master the basics and study good models, from the Stanford and LSU Facebook pages to the University of Lincoln Nebraska’s Planet Red and Furman’s Engage proprietary networks to the new blog-driven strategy at Loyola’s Graduate School of Business.Continental Ballroom, Mezzanine Level20101013T13000020101013T163000Fritz McDonald (Stamats, Inc.)